Barnstorf Will Take You To New Heights

For the most part it’s a little hard to differentiate between the town of Barnstorf and the Samtgemeinde Barnstorf. The Santa-what, you’re asking? I know, a bit confusing, but one is the town itself, the other is a collective municipality of three other towns.

For some it would only be proper to give each town their own shout-out, but they’re very proud of their association — so I’m gonna tell you a little about what you’ll find in these villages in Lower Saxony.

What do you want to hear about first, the outdoorsy stuff or the historical info? Did you say outdoor stuff? OK, here’s the skinny on what you can do outdoors in (and around) Barnstorf…

The town is located right along the Wildeshauser Geest and the Dümmer Nature Park. Ooh, plenty of hiking trails to keep everyone busy, I must say. On top of it, the place sits just to the west of the Große Moor, a bog area that’s also great for a hike or two over by the village of Eydelstedt.

Don’t worry if your feet get tired, try canoeing. There are like thirteen “stops” along the waterway if your arms get tired. In that case, hop on a horse for a ride along unpaved country lanes, or take a horse & carriage ride.

Shoot, I’m tired and I didn’t even get to the old buildings yet. In a nutshell, Barnstorf has this totally fantastic 12th century church with this octagon tower. I call the quintessential village church, they just call it the Lutheran Church of St. Vitus.

It wouldn’t be right not to mention the Gothic churches found around these parts. There are two in the village of Drebber — St. James (13th century) and the St. Mary’s Stiftskirche that’s the final resting place of some 16th century Count of Diepholzer.

You really wanna get a good look around? Take the Jan-Spieker-Bahn — a “locomotive” that drives you around the area.

You could just visit the Local History Museums — and yes, that’s plural. One is in Drebber, the other in Barnstorf — an old farm from the 17th century. And be sure to get a good picture of the Keunecke Haus, a half-timbered jewel from 1784.

What else is old around here? The 19th century Jewish cemetery, the 18th century town cemetery, and oh, the megalithic grave over at the Walsener Teichen (that’s pond in English).

Want to know another reason to come to Bernstorf? How about its Balloon Festival — and not the little birthday kind, either. We’re talking about the big hot air, cruising high above the ground kind. Interested? It takes place in August on odd-numbered years.

Whether it’s one or all of Barnstof’s villages, on the ground or above it, you’ll just love it here — I just know you will.

 

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