Burghausen Castle Is The Lengthiest Castle Complex In Europe

As the longest castle in Europe, and indeed, one of the largest in the world, a trip to Burghausen Castle (Burg zu Burghausen) is more than worth your time.

About The Burghausen Castle And Its History

The history of the Burghausen Castle can be traced all the way back to the Bronze Age. The lofty hill on which the castle sits was occupied since these early times. In 600 A.D., there was already a large wooden fortification that was built by the Dukes of Bavaria.

The current castle that sits there dates back to 1025 A.D. and was transferred to the Wittelsbachs, a royal family of Bavaria, in 1168 following the death of Count Gebhard II.

By 1255, with the partitioning of Bavaria, Burg zu Burghausen came to be an additional residence for the Dukes of Lower Bavaria. These dukes spent several centuries further expanding and strengthening the castle.

The need for extra fortification became particularly important in the 1400s, when there was great anxiety of a Turkish invasion from 1480 to 1490. While their fears didn’t come to pass, the result was that Burghausen Castle became the fiercest stronghold in all the land and gained in influence.

The castle had a few more notable moments throughout the next few centuries. From 1634 to 1641, during the Thirty Years’ War, the palace was a prison for Gustav Horn, the second-in-command of the Swedish forces, and who led them to victory in the Battle of Breitenfeld.

Burghausen Castle Highlights And Features

Courtyards

The castle courtyards are an important architectural element of Burghausen Castle. There are a total of six courtyards and each one contains (or once contained) a drawbridge, a moat, and its own fortified gate.

The third courtyard is particularly notable for its excellent condition, In this one, visitors can see a wonderfully-preserved bridge and gate. Once there stood an impressive forge in this narrowest part of the castle.

The fourth courtyard is also noteworthy for its macabre personality. In this courtyard, you can visit the Hexenturm (Witches Tower a.k.a. the Torture Tower) as well as a dank, dark and deep old dungeon.

The sixth courtyard is the largest and contains a Clock Tower.

Museums

In addition to the actual castle itself, Burghausen is home to two museums. With a visit here, you can also check out the Historical Town Museum for a fun lesson in history.

Or you can pay a visit to the House of Photography — Dr. Robert-Gerlich- Museum. There is a collection of over 1,000 cameras from throughout history, from the earliest ones that were made of wood up to today’s sleek and complicated designs. You can learn all about the origins of various camera components as well, like the shutter or the flash.

Burghausen Castle Location And Opening Hours

The Castle of Burghausen may be found in the city of the same name, Burghausen, located in the region of Upper Bavaria. Burghausen lies about 113 km (70 mi) east of Munich, at the Austrian border.

You can get there easily with your navigation system. The street address is “Burg Nr. 48, 84489 Burghausen.” There is a parking available on the premises. The nearby Autobahns include the A3, A8 and A9. The Bundestra├če B12 and B20 run directly to the city.

You can also catch the train to the Burghausen station. From there, it’s a five minute taxi ride or a half-hour footpath. There are buses that will also take you to the castle.

Burghausen Castle Opening Hours

Burghausen Castle is open year-round. It is closed on limited holidays, like New Years, Christmas and Shrove Tuesday. In the summer months of April to September, visiting hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. From October to March, you can visit from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.

Burghausen Castle Web site: http://www.burg-burghausen.de

 

Learn more about Bavaria Holiday Homes
preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload