The Dollart Exists Thanks To Frisian Fighting Factions

I’m not going to split hairs or anything, but from here on out you won’t ever hear the word Dollard come from my keyboard. It’s the Dollart. Dollard is the Dutch name for this bay found along the German/Netherland border around the Ems Estuary.

Does the name Dollard (Dollart, Dollert) sound familiar? It should, the Dollard Route follows along the Dollart and its awesomely fantastic.

What created the Dollard Bay in the first place? It’s believed that it wasn’t a natural occurrence, happening when Frisian fighting factions ruined the dikes that protected the waterway in the Middle Ages.

One of the biggest towns that benefited from this 100 square kilometer bay was the seaport of Emden. Curious how a fishing village like this is more famous for its Pinkel, a kale dish served with bacon and smoked pork.

Emden, BTW, is one of the last towns along the Dollard Route; and where the Dollart meets the North Sea.

After some time scoping out all the windmills, the Maritime Museum, and the East Frisian State Museum, maybe you’d like to visit the Tea Museum in Leer — the heart of East Frisia.

A Tea Museum awaits you here. And yes, I’m aware this isn’t the famous tea drinking country of England, but that’s the beverage of choice up in these parts of Germany.

You know what else is famous up here? That’s right, bird watching (a variety of species of goose like the salty marshes and brackish water, I guess).Plus, the area where you’ll find the Dollart technically belongs to the Wadden Sea National Park (the Lower Saxony section).

Totally cool, ’cause that means mudflat hiking. What’s really awesome about that is more than three-quarters of the Dollart goes dry during low tide. Plenty of room to explore, just be quick about it since the tide will roll back in quick enough.

If you’re tired from hiking around (and in) the Dollart, there are places called Melkhuske — a great place to grab a cold glass of milk that’ll recharge your nature loving batteries.

You could also take a Bike Taxi around the Dollart, which is perfect in case you’re too tired after cycling around it. Not sure why you’d be, the ground is really level.

Oh, who am I kidding. I’m not biking my way back — and I gotta get to Bunde somehow.

Bunde has a Dollart Museum, so if you want to learn all about the local flora & fauna, as well as its legends and mysteries, this is the best place to do it.

You go ahead, I’ll enjoy that cup of tea while I wait for that bike taxi to show up. ;-)

 

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