Falkenberg (Elster) — Six Villages Vying For Fame

Close to Bad Liebenwerda in southern Brandenburg, the town of Falkenberg (Elster) is made up of six villages, each with their own flair and sights to see.

Frankly, many of the sights in Falkenberg are the village’s churches. But, many of them have a number of festivals throughout the year to make coming here a lot of fun.

In Falkenberg proper, there is a museum (right on the Marktplatz) that is part Local History and part Natural History. Come on over to the Tourist Office where they’ll give you all sorts of information on local accommodations and events.

I’ll fill you in about some of those events while we’re exploring around Falkenberg together. OK? Good, ’cause we’re headed to Rehfeld, whose 20th century church houses a 12th century baptismal font.

Over in Beyern, there’s a 13th century church and a Parsonage building that’s the oldest house in town, built in 1738.

Großrössen also has a village church, but also hosts an annual Summer Festival, a Village Folk Festival, and an Oktoberfest. It also lies along the Schweinert Nature Reserve, where you’ll see one of the biggest Bronze Age burial mounds ever found.

Its sister village, Kleinrössen, also has a charming village church, and hosts many concerts and events as well as Sunday services. You’ll probably get a chance to meet all the residents, as there are only 75 of them.

Kleinrössen also lies along the Schwarze-Elster-Radweg, a 100km scenic route that you take by bike; and where you’ll find the Schwarze Elster Bridge, saved in 1945 from being destroyed by the bravery of one man.

Kölsa is quite a bit bigger than Kleinrössen, a village of just over 700 people. Most visitors to Kölsa come to see its historical village church; but a good deal more of them come for Village Celebration on the second weekend of August, and the annual Nicholas Fair.

The last village of Falkenberg (Elster) is Schmerkendorf, which too has a village church to see. But, I’d also suggest looking for its 700 year old Elm tree and its early 17th century rectory.

Noticed that I haven’t mentioned a castle in all this time? Did you think that Falkenberg didn’t have one? Guess what, Falkenberg itself doesn’t, but nearby Sallgast does. The Schloss Sallgast almost wasn’t, saved in the nick of time before the Swedes leveled it during the Thirty Years’ War.

Good thing, because this Renaissance castle is quite striking; and is now a restaurant, hotel, and the tower houses a small history museum.

See, I told you each of Falkenberg’s villages had something to see & do—and there’s a castle thrown in for something extra. ;-)

 

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