German Autobahn Refers To The Super High Speed Road

The German Autobahn was first constructed between Cologne and Bonn in 1931. Today, Autobahns are worldwide well-known for being a place of freedom — you may drive as fast as you desire (yes, even more than 300 km/h or 186 mi/h ;-), unless signalized otherwise with plates indicating a speed limit.

Autobahns are built and maintained by the federal government and are hence also known as federal motorway. The point was to restrict traffic to motorized vehicles capable of doing a certain speed without interference from pedestrians and other forms of transportation.

All Autobahn numbers start with an A. This famed German road stretches about 11,000 km forming a perfect network that connects all parts of Germany.

Contrary to popular myths, not all drivers do go at the speed of blur; most drive as normal motorists on freeways around the world — although it is correct that one may drive without limits in terms of speed on some Autobahns. There are restrictions on certain low tech vehicles and these roads are meant for the state-of-the-art vehicles that are normally made in Germany.

The German Autobahn does not permit bicycles and mopeds as in free ways the world over. Slow vehicles must keep to the right and allow faster ones to pass. Drivers are supposed to stay in the right lane except when overtaking. No U turns are allowed neither is it sensible to do so. ;-) Same goes for parking, stopping or reversing. Parking on shoulders and ramps for emergencies may be permitted.

When entering an Autobahn the one entering has to give way to those already driving by. Accidents and breakdowns should be reported immediately. If you run out of fuel it is considered illegal as it’s an oversight that you could have prevented. Familiar signs indicate the presence of fuel, parking areas, snack bars, rest rooms, and restaurants (indicated as Rastst├Ątte) as well as the distance to them.

The German Autobahn has produced its own system of etiquettes which has become a matter of course for motorists. Drivers at the back of traffic jams turn on their hazard lights to warn oncoming traffic to slowdown. Drivers are generally courteous and keep lane discipline and signal intentions well in advance. This is probably the reason why there is a very low rate of accidents on German Autobahns when compared to freeways in other countries.

 

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