German Seas Show You The Essence Of Life

If you’re wondering which seas Germany has (if any ;-), and if German seas equal beaches… Rest assured, we do.

You are aware of our Big Two, the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, aren’t you? But did you also know ’bout a “third” sea in Germany, the Wadden Sea? What? You missed that the first time around. ;-)

Well, the Wadden Sea is an incredible body of water, that’s also a National Park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany.

Bird watchers, this is your kind of place. Did you know that more than 12 million birds come here every year to use the area as a breeding ground? I guess you mudflat hikers better look up. And you gotta have something to do when the tide’s high and you can’t walk out over the mudflats, don’t ya?

In case you weren’t aware, the Wadden Sea is found in the North Sea. Which, BTW, was totally overrun by Vikings at one point in Germany’s history. You won’t find any Vikings today, so the biggest threat are the storms and gales.

Tish-tosh! A good storm is par for the course. ;-)

The North Sea (or Nordsee in German) doesn’t just flow to Germany’s coastline, it goes to England and the Netherlands and also around Scandinavia and Belgium. The North Sea Trail is a long-distance hiking route that’ll showcase it all.

Forget walking, it’s time to fish as the North Sea has over 225 species of fish (including lobster & shrimp). Keep a lookout for the seals and walrus, while you’re out there.

The North Sea also boasts Jade Bay (a.k.a. Jade Bight; Jadebusen in German), created from storm floods in the Middle Ages, which is part of the Wadden Sea National Park. If you’re looking at the water from Wilhelmshaven, you’re staring right at it. And the area was once used by the Imperial German Navy.

If you take the Kiel Canal from the North Sea, you can be at the Baltic Sea in just about no time. This gorgeous sea was once ruled over by the Hanseatic League, and created by Ice Age glaciers. It gets cold around the Baltic — and it’s known to freeze over in some areas.

This sea’s got it all, by the way. From fjords (like Kiel Fjord, Flensburg Fjord), to islands like Rügen and Usedom, and a couple of awesome bays.

Kiel Bay is one of them, sitting right next to the Eckernförde Bay and the Flensburg Fjord along the German/Danish border. Kiel Bay gave some protection from the marauding Vikings — and is quite a busy waterway. The city of Kiel sits on the eastern side of the Kiel Canal — the busiest artificial waterway in the world.

Connected to Kiel Bay is the Mecklenburg Bay, or Mecklenburger Bucht. It’s the largest bay in the Baltic Sea, has a couple of uninhabited islands (like Walfisch), and has seaports in Lübeck, Wismar, and Rostock. It’s a great beach destination. Just ask anyone in Kühlungsborn or Dahme (Holstein).

Wismar Bay doesn’t want to be outdone, and it won’t. Too much research and underwater archaeology goes on here. And it’s really popular with bird watchers, as it sits along a bird sanctuary. Great for fishing too, I must admit. The Bay of Wismar, or Wismarer Bucht as it’s called in German, has its own island, and lies along a federal waterway. A good option, considering the bay is well-sheltered from the rough weather the Baltic Sea is famous for. Can’t be too bad, there’s a nude beach out on Poel Island.

Just put some clothes on if you’re going to check out any of the lighthouses that dot the coastal landscape, OK?

Other Seas in Germany

  • Dollart — A small, cute bay in the northwest of Lower Saxony.

 

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