Gmund am Tegernsee — An Upper Bavarian Asset

Some people might say the fact that the Upper Bavarian town of Gmund am Tegernsee isn’t very touristy isn’t a good thing. On the flip side, that very fact might be its best asset.

What Gmund is really known for is paper, more specifically paper that’s made for currency. Hmm, I guess I stand corrected — money is Gmund’s biggest asset.

I love cash as much as the next person, but somehow the Bavarian Alps off in the distance kind of make me forget all about that. Hey, something has to — because honestly, there isn’t much sightseeing going on.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s some. Places like the Maria-Hilf Kapelle, a simple plague chapel built in the midst of the Thirty Years’ War back in 1634. And the St. Giles Church, whose new-fangled Baroque style conceals its original medieval beginnings from the year 1087.

Even older in Gmund is Burg Ebertshausen, or should I say, what’s left of this 8th century lowland castle that used to have a moat at one point. Nearby is Gut Kaltenbrunn, a farm begun all the way back in the Middle Ages. Today it’s a more modern place, complete with its own complex (and not without controversy, BTW).

And to go back to the Baroque period, come see the Church of St. Quirin. Be sure you’ve left enough time for yourself to take in a stop along the Kirchenweg to see a 17th century rectory; and at Seestraße 2 there’s an old Jägerhaus, a hunter’s lodge that’s constructed with a unique gabled roof & porch design.

A gabled what? Doesn’t matter… all you need to know is the chalet looking building is quite pretty.

For anyone who doesn’t care about that particular kind of stuff might be more interested in the great outdoors. This is Upper Bavaria, and along Lake Tegernsee and the Mangfall River, so any choice of hiking trail will be lovely. A ferry ride around the lake would be a good idea, just so you know.

I guess I was wrong again. Money and less-touristy aren’t Gmund’s biggest assets — its vibrant countryside with all its old farmsteads and buildings are. Come, and you’ll agree with that, too.

 

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