Königsee-Rottenbach — Joined Forces For Natural Beauties

Before we even get started, let me begin with: this is not about the Bavarian Königssee (a lake in in the Berchtesgadener Land). Nope, this MyGermanCity.com page is all about the Thuringian town of Königsee. And just because it might not be as famous as its namesake, doesn’t mean it’s any less enjoyable.

Wait, something’s not right here… Oh yes, to make things even more confusing, in 2012 the town joined forces with the town of Rottenbach, merging into the all-new Königsee-Rottenbach. Hmm, now there’s no confusing it with the lake, is there?

Whatever you choose to call it, these days it’s 17 districts of charming towns & villages with half-timbered houses, great cultural events, and marked “scenic routes” like the Klosterweg, or Monastery Trail.

The Klosterweg, by the way, might not be that long (just 11 km) but it’ll take you past monastery ruins in the village of Paulinzella. This old Benedictine monastery was founded over a thousand years ago, and even inspired Schiller to write about it. Also in Paulinzella is a grand Jagdschloss (Hunting Lodge) housing a museum about the castle and neighboring monastery.

By the way, Paulinzella is also the reason why this town is part of the 300 km long Classics Road, another scenic route.

Now that I think about it, increasing its number of villages increases its number of festivals, doesn’t it? Whoo-hoo! Yeah, bring on the Easter bonfires, the Carnival celebrations, the Straßenfest every May, the Christmas Market (1st weekend of Advent), the Kirmes and Walderntedankfest in October.

Wow, I’m tired and I haven’t even done all this yet. I will cheer on the runners for Königsee’s annual marathon — but there’s not a fat chance in hell that I’ll run it. I will, however, trek along parts of the Thüringenweg — with 23 “stations” spread out over 410 km. ;-)

Heck, I’ll even gasp in awe at the Stadtkirche, a neo-Gothic church of dark stone from the 1860s. And without a doubt, I’ll be happy & content to enjoy a summer concert at the monastery ruins — taking in all the amazing medieval architecture.

And I’m in awe of the recently created Spiralbohrer (spiral drill) in front of the Town Hall in Königsee proper. With a length of 2.2 meters and a weight of 88 kg, it’s said to be the world’s biggest spiral drill. Good ol’ German engineering.

Yeah, the other Königssee might be more famous, but not for long — I’ll be singing this Königsee’s (excuse me, Königsee-Rottenbach) praises to anyone who’ll listen.

 

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