Lorsch — World Famous Due To Its Lorsch Abbey

You might find yourself in Lorsch because of its most auspicious location near the Odenwald, Mannheim, Heidelberg, and Darmstadt. Or, you can come to this incredibly old city on your own volition and see what has become of the city from the Franco-German Empire of the early Middle Ages and understand why it’s called the “Gateway to the Bergstraße.”

Yes, ladies and gentlemen, Lorsch is the home of the famous (more like infamous) Lorsch Abbey which was built in the 8th century. Though in ruins today, you can see the beautiful, stunning, incredible (insert your own adjective here) work of Carolingian art in all of Germany, if not the world.

Lorsch Abbey is UNESCO World Heritage Site and it won’t take but a moment to realize it rightfully belongs. The King’s Hall and the Church are most impressive and Lorsch’s Abbey has at least 2 Carolingian kings buried here.

Lorsch’s Abbey also has a wonderful Museum Center, which visitors from all over the world come to see. Take a look into the not so easy monastic life, its folklore, its Benedictine herb garden, and even a Tobacco Museum.

A word of advice… Keep an eye out for the geese that walk freely about the ruins. ;-)

As much as there is to see within the Abbey complex itself, there’s still more to do in Lorsch. Its Town Hall, built in 1714, is lovely and deserves a photo-op.

Lorsch’s oldest half-timbered building is located at Stiftstraße 19, but you’ll find plenty at the Marketplace, on Schulstraße, Kirchstraße, and on Bahnhofstraße. If those old houses aren’t romantic enough for you, you’ll find a real romantic spot over at the Wattenheim Bridge.

When the sun goes down and your day of sightseeing is done, take in a show over at the Concert Hall Rex or at the Sapperlot Theater. Both have a variety of concerts, comedies, plays, and other entertainment to keep you busy.

In another type of typical German culture, there’s the beer garden; you’ll find a few tucked away in this Hessian haven.

If you like sweets instead of hops, then the Lorscher Welschbrot might be right up your alley. Made with flour, butter, sugar, anise, and raisins this cake bread is quite the local celebrity — and one of the few places in Germany where you’ll find it. It’s only fitting, since there are few places in Germany like Lorsch.

 

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