Nordholz — From The UNESCO Mudflats To Refreshing Skies

For an area of Lower Saxony known for shipping, fishing, and anything else maritime, you’d be surprised to find a really awesome museum that houses airplanes and helicopters.

Thanks, Nordholz, you’ve gotten the attention of any airplane lover out there! ;-)

When you see a stature of Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin you know you’re in the right place, the Aeronauticum. This German airship and Naval Air Museum houses everything from Pembrokes to Fairey Gannets, and Sea Hawks. These are on permanently on display, and the museum regularly houses special exhibits.

Speaking of airships, Nordholz is home to the Cuxhaven/Nordholz Airport [FCN], so it’s fairly easy to get here.

Inasmuch as I’m fascinated with airplanes, it’s the sea that calls my name here. How could it not, it’s right in the Nature Park Wadden Sea (Naturpark Wattenmeer) — an UNESCO World Heritage Site — where you can go mudflat hiking.

It’s simple enough, really, just find a guide to take you out on the mudflats when the tide goes out. Ahh, walking along the North Sea never felt so good.

It’s good for you, too. The salty air makes Nordholz a real therapeutic destination. As if the walking, hiking, and Nordic Walking wasn’t enough?

The Wattwagen is pretty popular. It’s a horse pulled wagon tour that’ll take you out to one of the outlying islands. If this 4-hour “tour” is too long for you, take a ferry back to Cuxhaven once you get to the island.

If you’ve come back with the wagon, look for the Krabbenpulmaschine. It’s a machine that processes crabs straightaway — cutting the “process” time down, bringing you fresher crabs to eat.

Don’t tell me you didn’t know there were crabs to be found on this piece of sandy beach, did you? This is a fishing village. :-)

I’m thinking this might be why the town sponsors “Fishing Weekends” for two nights from September until Christmas. It might be a bit chilly, but a true fisherman would brave the cold.

At least, that’s what I’m told. ;-)

You won’t, however, be forced to spend the night at Nordholz’s Naturist Campground. Oh, that’s just a dainty way of saying it’s a nude campground. A clothing-required campground is also here, if you’re interested.

I’d prefer to slather myself up with all that sea mud instead of choosing whether to visit a nude campground or not. Would you?

 

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