Pulsnitz — Stuff Yourself With Gingerbread And Culture

Some people half expect that one wouldn’t find much in the town of Pulsnitz in the state of Saxony.

Oh, how wrong (wrong, wrong, wrong)…

Pulsnitz has everything one could possibly ask for in a town; history, beautiful countryside, and great food.

Not just any food, mind you. Nope, Pulsnitz is a Gingerbread Town — and some eight bakeries in town make Pfefferkuchen, a local gingerbread that’s generally so beautifully decorated that eating it is almost sinful.

At the Haus des Gastes (that sounds like the Tourist Info, doesn’t it) you can decorate your own Lebkuchen (as gingerbread is called in German). Try some that are already decorated, and wander around the tiny museum.

Sorry, the guided tours of Pulsnitz won’t take you to make your own gingerbread — the tour takes you to the Market and Church Squares (the Marktplatz still has its medieval flair), the Castle Park, and along some beautifully cobblestoned streets.

The City Museum is excellent for learning about this Upper Lusatia’s tradition of making pottery, crafts, and weaving.

Look out for both the 18th century Mile Marker (funny, since Germany uses kilometers) and a 19th century Saxon Mile Marker. Along the way you’ll see remnants of the town’s fortification wall from the Middle Ages, and its St. Nicholas Church (built 1473).

As with any great medieval town, there’s got to be a castle, right? Oh, except it’s not a medieval castle — this is a part Renaissance and part Baroque palace (it used to have a moat, and was used as a hospital at one time). It’s French and English gardens are the site of many outdoor concerts.

Speaking of gardens, come see Pulsnitz’s Biblical Garden. And I would certainly come see the statue of one of the town’s favorite sons, a sculptor by the name of Ernst Rietschel. He’s buried at the city cemetery; which is where you’ll find the St. Michael Church and a World War I Memorial, which is a somber piece of a mother crying for her son.

Wow, where do you manage to go after something like that?

How about the Peasant Fortification? This tiny cottage looking building (known as Hussitenhaus or Wehranlage Perfert) is the only one of its kind in the entire region, built in 1420 — with exhibits on the area’s farming traditions. One thing though, it’s only open on the 1st Sunday of the month, so you better make sure you’re here then to see it.

Otherwise, I guess you’ll have to stuff yourself with gingerbread — like many others do. ;-)

 

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