Raschau-Markersbach — Lime Works In The Ore Mountains

Sometimes I try to imagine how a place looked many years ago; and I try to imagine what someone from years ago would think of the place today. Like, would someone who lived in the Saxon town of Raschau-Markersbach many centuries ago like the place that it is today?

If they were smart, they would. Think about it, during the Thirty Years’ War, Raschau-Markersbach was totally devastated and burned down. Today it’s a charming place with tidy homes and neat little lanes.

What’s not to love about that, right?

Medieval residents of Raschau-Markersbach would recognize its Church of St. Barbara, right down to its Gothic features and pointed arched windows. The Baroque roof might throw them off a bit, though. In reality, this church is thought to be one of the oldest in all of the Erzgebirge — or the Ore Mountains in English.

FYI, come to think of it, medieval residents might not recognize the name — the formerly two independent towns of Raschau and Markersbach weren’t joined together until 2008.

The All Saints Church is another oldie in Raschau-Markersbach, but its “new” Baroque design belies its original Romanesque foundation. On the inside you’ll find beautiful old murals. Always good to see, I think.

Over by All Saints is its Rectory; a goodie to see because of its half-timbered design. You’ll find quite a number of framework houses here in town, many of them farmhouses from the 17th century.

A new addition to the place is the Kalkwerk, a 19th century testament to industry. Located in the Langenberg district, it’s in ruins now, but at one time it was a bustling place along a limestone quarry.

And in the village of Unterscheibe there are a couple of mills from the 18th and 19th centuries, as well. One of them is even a Technical Museum, if you’re interested. Raschau-Markersbach’s other monument to German engineering is the Markersbacher Viadukt, standing some 37 meters high.

Yeah, Raschau-Markersbach might look a bit (a lot in some regards) different from its medieval and Renaissance days, but today it’s a wonderful place to be. Well, if you’re smart, you’ll think so.

 

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