Römhild — The Celts Of Yesteryear Would Approve

It’s believed the town of Römhild is one of the oldest towns in all of Thuringia. That’s easy enough to believe, since the place was once crawling with Celts years before the modern era.

Not too much of the Celts’ days remain, but the Kelten-Erlebnisweg does find itself making its way through town. This scenic route of sorts is some 254km (158mi) dedicated to their culture. So, if you want to learn more about the Celts’ history through, then it should be off to the Museum of Pre & Early History for you.

For me it’s always about the castles, so it’s off to Schloss Glücksburg — a 16th century edifice whose origins actually date back to the Middle Ages. These days Schloss Glücksburg is part Local History Museum, part Doll Museum, and chocked full of antiques.

While not a museum, Schloss Bedheim is still a castle worthy of a snapshot. Actually, it looks really creepy in the fading winter light — but that just makes me love it even more. Too bad the Lustschloss is gone, once the summer residence for some aristocrat — but at least the cemetery chapel (17th/18th centuries) remains. And I need to give an honorable mention to the Burgruine Hartsburg, too.

Nothing’s really left of the Steinsburg, that used to be a Celtic oppidum — circa the 2nd/1st century B.C. Hey, if this was before history was written, how does anyone know?

Nevermind, too much other stuff to see and do. No, I gonna ponder about how much things have changed here in Römhild over the last 400 years — and thank my lucky stars there aren’t any more witch hunts.

I guess everyone’s too busy partying at Römhild’s festivals — it’s super fun times at the Kalter Markt, held the last Thursday of every January. This market has its roots from many years ago, as the town was once a stop on an ancient trade route.

Too cold for you? No problem, the Pottery Market’s a popular event held every August.

And if you have any time left then come over to the village of Milz, close to ancient tumuli fields (ancient burial grounds), and there’s some great half-timbered houses here, along with the medieval St. Mary Magdalene Church.

My guess would be the Celts from ages ago would approve of their Römhild these days — and it’s got my stamp of approval, too. ;-)

 

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