Rommerskirchen — Rhenish Culture, Buildings, And Fetes

In the far west of Germany, equal distance between Düsseldorf and Cologne, is Rommerskirchen. It’s too bad this place doesn’t get the publicity it rightfully deserves.

There are seventeen local parts to Rommerskirchen. In many of the local villages you’ll find the epitome of a small village square; the heart and soul of a medieval town.

With so many it might be difficult to see ALL of them, but you won’t want to miss Evinghoven and Nettesheim’s Village Squares, respectively. Both have their fair share of the old timber-framed buildings that are quite popular around the country.

Nettesheim’s square is also highlighted by St. Martinus’ Church. Residents built this Romanesque church back in 1195, only the tower remains from this time, however. Of the church’s seven walking marks, only five survived World War II. After seeing the inside, take a look at the outside. There’s a cemetery park with a memorial to the First World War.

The highlight of the churches found in Rommerskirchen is the Lambertuskapelle, or St. Lambertus Chapel. This tiny chapel is one of the oldest in all of the Rhineland, believed to be built back in the 9th century.

Older still are the Frankish graves that were found under St. Peter’s Church in the village of Rommerskirchen proper. Even those aren’t as old as the Roman settlement ruins and its Mansion Rustica that were found here.

If you want to travel further back into history, then this is the place to do it. This little town even has ancient grave hills from the Stone Age. Um, yeah, that’s pretty old considering the Stone Age goes back a few thousand years B.C.!

Don’t think that now you’ve taken your magic carpet ride back to prehistoric days that your journey in Rommerskirchen is over. No, you’ve got things to do; just the sporty recreation kind. Yes, you’ll find the tree-line foresty trails through the countryside for walking and cycling. But, you’ll also find 27-holes over at the Golf & Country Club Velderhof.

To exercise the brain cells, make sure to see the Cultural Center in Sinsteden with a huge collection from the sculptor Ulrich Rückriem.

Another way to learn more of Rommerkirchen’s culture is at its annual Folk Festival. Local Rhenish cuisine mixed with other locally made goods, parades, and all-around festivities makes for a jolly grand time. Wanna know when to come? Be here on the 1st weekend in September.

Hopefully, I’ve managed to toot Rommerkirchen’s horn loud enough. History, food, culture, there really isn’t much more you can ask for.

Oh wait, yeah there is… don’t forget about the castle in Ramrath!

 

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