Stadtoldendorf — Off-Roading To The Pilgrimage

Technically the town of Stadtoldendorf is the “administrative center” of the Collective Municipality of Escherhausen-Stadtoldendorf. As a whole, the population is around 15,000 people, encompassing some 121 square kilometers.

Nothing personal to the whole municipality — but it’s a busy week, so I’m only concentrating on the 24 square kilometers of Stadtoldendorf itself.

Besides, you don’t care that much about political intricacies anyway, do you? ;-)

It isn’t as if you’ll be scrounging for things to do — there’s plenty to keep each and every one of you busy enough. History buffs should appreciate Burg Homburg. Built around the year 1050, this castle stood for some 500 years before being destroyed in 1535 — making it a ruin for just about as long as it functioned.

Another one of Stadtoldendorf’s medieval sites is the Kloster Amelungsborn, believed to be the second oldest in all of Lower Saxony. Imagine the stories it could tell from its humble beginnings in 1135, to how it managed to survive through the Reformation, and how it was severely damaged during World War II.

The 20th century gave today’s Stadtoldendorf some places to see, too. On weekends from March to October, you’re able to visit the Motorcycle Museum (which has some old cars, too), and it wouldn’t be right not to see the Freizeitpark Mammut. Oh this latter one is a treat if you like to go off-roading or “mudding” in monster trucks, ATVs, or 4-wheelers.

Too tired to drive home? No problem, there are campsites here to spend the night.

While you’re bound to meet some mighty nice folks at the off-road track, you’ll meet more at one of the town’s festivals. You’ll certainly eat good if you’re here for the Potato Roasts, the Kartoffelbratfest (Potato Festival) in September, and the Volks- und Sch├╝tzenfest every June.

Don’t worry if it gets too noisy for you — it’ll be quiet enough along the Pilgerweg Loccum-Volkenroda, a 300 km long pilgrimage route running right through town. Looking at the regional artists’ work at the Alte Rathaus (Old Town Hall), or from atop the Stadtoldendorf’s landmark, the F├Ârsterbergturm (Ranger Mountain Tower), won’t be a noisy venture either.

Another quiet place is the Jewish Cemetery (ain’t that true for most cemeteries) — as the town once had a bustling Jewish population. There was a synagogue here too; a memorial stone marks its former spot.

A lot of Stadtoldendorf’s history can be learned from its City Museum, about how the town has changed and remained the same over the years. All I know is, I’ll have to come back again to do the other villages of Escherhausen-Stadtoldendorf — and that’s all right, I loved what I saw already.

 

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