Work in Germany is Rewarding and Plentiful

To work in Germany is always a pleasure. You are surrounded by wonderful people and an incredible landscape while having the opportunity of making a good living.

You’ll find positions according to your skill in the German language. Even if you only speak English, you can locate jobs which take employees who speak no German. English companies who have branches in Germany are always looking for English-speaking staff.

Your ability in the field you are seeking to work in is, of course, a huge factor in getting hired. If you have no skills in the computer area, it would be wise not to apply for a job requiring these abilities. This goes without saying really.

Your language abilities may end up coming second to a particular skill you may have. If you are genius at developing new engineering concepts, your ability at speaking German may not have that much importance.

If you are relocating, there will be more involved than just finding the perfect job. You will have things to consider like where you will live, where the children will attend school and finding the right transportation. All these things will have an impact on the work you find.

When applying for work in Germany, there are various things you must know. You will find applying for a work permit, if you are coming from outside Germany, can be time-consuming and sometimes a bit problematic. Each family member must apply for a permit separately. You can’t apply as a group.

When applying for a job, realize it isn’t the same type of process as it would be, for example, in the US. You won’t find the usual cover letter format.

To go about locating a job, you must use common sense and planning. Sometimes those looking for jobs overestimate their abilities and develop unreal expectations. Study the job requirements thoroughly and work out if you can indeed accomplish them.

If you are a student looking for part-time employment, you will likely not need a work permit. But in this case, your income may have a strict limit. If you have any questions about this when getting hired, ask your employer.

Naturally, income from work in Germany is taxed. The tax system in Germany includes compulsory contributions to social insurance, covering medical and pensions. The tax bands range from 0% to 42%, depending on the amount of taxable yearly income.

When you are working, the social security cost is split equally between you and your employer. The same goes for health care costs. This is not unusual for it’s the same pretty much the world over.

You will get time off at work on national holidays. Most German holidays are the same as other parts of the world, such as Labor Day, New Years, Christmas and Easter. In Germany there are also two other main holidays — German Unity Day (Tag der Deutschen Einheit) and St. Stephens Day (Zweiter Weihnachtsfeiertag).

When searching for work in Germany, you will find the regular classified ads in papers, posted on bulletin boards, and so on. You can also find signs in the windows of shops. Go about your search with a positive attitude and you’ll be hired quickly and happily. Temporary Staffing and HR Service agencies are also a big help.

There’s so much opportunity and room to grow with any work in Germany that you find. This wonderful country is a place to achieve your dreams and fulfill your goals — really. :-)

 

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