Zahna-Elster — Next To Sightseeing Heavy Hitters

After spending yet another week totally in Saxony-Anhalt, thanks to the people responsible for the reorganization of Zahna-Elster, I’m looking for a change.

No, I’m not leaving this neck of the woods yet. And why would I want to, considering Zahna-Elster borders Wittenberg, with Coswig (Anhalt) just one jump over.

Heavy hitters in the sightseeing department, huh?

So, while I figure out what kind of change I’m looking for, I’m happy to be here — even if there isn’t a whole lotta sightseeing.

If you’re coming from Berlin or Halle, you’re going to come to Bülzig first, because this is where the railway line comes in.

From here you’ve got a few choices of where to go next. Anywhere but the town of Zahna, save that for last.

OK, so how about Dietrichsdorf with its charming brick church from 1705, or its former mill that’s now a restaurant.

Great, efficiency — sightseeing & lunch at the same time. ;-)

Gadegast has its very own village church, as well. Curious, considering it has less than two hundred people living in this hamlet.

There are even less people who live in the three hamlets of Leetz.

Mühlanger is a little bigger. And a little more active, with a Park Celebration in mid-June, a competitive (yet fun) Volleyball Tournament in October, as well as a huge Autumn Bonfire.

In the town of Elster (Elbe) you can see where the Schwarze Elster empties into the Elbe River. Not enough for you? The epic Battle of Wartenburg stretched all the way here (crawling with Prussians and Napoleon’s troops), back in the day when the area belonged to the Kingdom of Saxony in the 19th century.

The last stop you’ll want to see is Zahna. Yes, it lies on the edge of the Fläming Nature Park, and yes it has a Farmers Museum and a 13th century Stone Church.

But, none of them did it for me — I’m equally torn between the pink Stift zum Heiligen Geist (Church of the Holy Spirit) or the massive Kreuzkirche (Church of the Cross) that was built in the 10th or 12th century (not sure).

Then there’s that red brick building from 1897. Most won’t recognize that as the Town Hall.

Forget change — I need to stick around until I’ve figured out which one of these churches I like better. ;-)

 

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