Zwickau — The ‘Detroit Of East Germany’

Zwickau is to be found in a valley at the foot of the Erzgebirge or Ore Mountains in East Germany, in the state Saxony (Sachsen). It is well placed on the left bank of the Zwickauer Mulde river.

The city, located in a coal-mining region, is an industrial center. Chemicals, electrical apparatus, mining machinery, and textiles are manufactured in here.

Places of significance comprise the 16th-century town hall and the 15th-century Church of Saint Mary. Both have a rank among the finest examples of German Gothic architecture. It is hometown of the German composer Robert Schumann.

It was established as a Slavic settlement in the 11th century. Subsequently, in the 12th century, it started to flourish as a trading center and was made a city in 1220. From 1290 to 1323, the town dominated as a free imperial city and became subject to the principality of Meissen.

Gradually, it transformed into an industrial city in the 19th century. For the period of the Second World War, in 1945, the government operated a Nazi concentration camp here. The city was placed under Soviet control after liberation by the Americans. From the time 1949–1990, it belonged to East Germany and was a hub for the coal mining.

Zwickau is also known as the City Of Churches — it has nine of them. The excellent Gothic church of St. Mary, which was built from 1451-1536 is a splendid work of art. By way of its spire bulky bell, it draws a good number of tourists. Another beautiful church is the St. Catharine church, which was restored during 1893–94.

The town hall is the most famous site of the city and is regarded as one of the most beautiful secular buildings. It was created in 1581. It has civic documents, autograph of the works of Hans Sachs, and cloth merchants’ hall.

The August Horch Museum is a wonderful place for art lovers. The record of the Horch automobile factory captures your imaginations. Zwickau’s Christmas market, in the Erzgebirge foothills, is termed as one of the most gorgeous in Saxony. It is organized in the old quarter where Santa himself drops by every day at 4.30pm to see the children.

The Silver Mines path, Saxony’s first signposted picturesque course, runs for approx. 230km (143mi), starting here in this city and ends in Dresden.

Heritage is key to the region, and the city has preserved its heritage in a grand way, which is very much responsible for bringing prosperity to its people.

 

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