Bannewitz — A Saxonian Town You Can Enjoy All The Time

To the far east of Germany only a stone’s throw from the border of the Czech Republic is the mining town of Bannewitz, just south of Dresden.

Bannewitz in some ways has changed considerably from when only eleven people called this place home in 1552, to now where around 11,000 people live in the town’s eleven local parts. In other ways, the town hasn’t changed too much.

It’s still a place where hard working people get and set about their day, like they have for hundreds of years. They might pass the old farmhouse in the village of Bodenritz on their way to work. Or, they might climb up the Malakowturm with its Marienschacht in order to see the Ore Mountains in the distance.

The Mala-what of the Marien-what? Residents of Bannewitz will know what it is, but I’ll tell you — so you know to come see it when you’re in town. Since Bannewitz was a mining town, both the Malakowturm (tower) and the Marienschacht are now a mining and regional museum that’s open from March to November on the last Sunday of the month (10am-4pm).

Some local residents of Bannewitz are lucky enough to see the old Dutchman Windmill that still stands here, or the Possendorfer Church that is the landmark of the place. Its two towers stand 57 meters into the heavens and have since the church was built in 1521.

Speaking of being high up, you can also see the Triangulationssäule up on the Gohlig. Before you ask, it’s an old mile column on the area known as the Goldene Höhe or Golden Height. It’s historical, it’s significant, and it’s really pretty up here — so make the effort to come. You won’t be sorry, believe me.

When you come back down from the “Golden Height,” go see the Renaissance style Schloss Nöthnitz, which was built in 1635, then had a makeover in 1870. The castle once housed over 42,000 volumes of books and the famous 18th century German archaeologist, Johann Joachim Winckelmanns, who once worked here.

Herr Winckelmanns probably didn’t get to party at the Fire Brigade Celebration at the end of April, or cheer the runners on at the annual Eutschützer Run (beginning of June), or enjoy the Bannewitzer Cultural Days at the end of June.

He probably did celebrate the Oktoberfest (beginning of October — this isn’t Munich where it’s held in September) and shopped the Christmas Markets (1st and 2nd Advent weekend). If you’re here the week before Christmas there’s an annual Christmas concert to attend.

Like I said, some things have changed over the years and some haven’t; but, you’ll enjoy Bannewitz all the same.

 

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