Boxberg (Oberlausitz) — Big In Size, Fun To Love

Yikes, time to pull out the Sorbian to German to English dictionary again, all because of the town of Boxberg (Oberlausitz). Maybe I should say Hamor, as that’s its Sorbian name.

Whatever anyone chooses to call it, it doesn’t change the fact that Boxberg is one of the largest (if not the largest) town in Upper Lusatia — at least in terms of area.

It doesn’t matter how big it is if there isn’t anything to see or do — and thankfully there is. In the village of Klein Radisch (Radšowk) you’ll find an amazing Maltese Cross (called Steinkreuz) from the Middle Ages. There are a number of these medieval stone crosses throughout Boxberg’s eighteen villages, so be sure to look around.

As much as I’m totally groovin’ on all the history, it’s Boxberg’s natural side that had me giddy. The pine forests found along the Oberlausitzer Heide & Teichlandschaft Biosphere are great for leisurely walks or vigorous hikes.

But, between you and me, the best is cycling along the Wolfsradweg. Yes, there’s a scenic route dedicated to the often misunderstood wolf. Along 43 kilometers you’ll learn all about these amazing pack creatures, how they’ve been the hunted almost to extinction, their role in legends and fairy tales, their social structure, and even how to tell the difference between them and dogs.

Also part of Boxberg’s natural side is the Bärwalder Lake, which is exceptionally popular for sailing and swimming, and even water skiing. Close to the lake is the Theater im Ohr, an ear shaped venue that hosts all sorts of performances from cabaret to comedy.

From here you should see the Findlingspark, created from all the boulders from its old mining days. At least they found an innovative way to reuse the stones, instead of blowing them up like they did back in the “golden days.” ;-)

Too bad I didn’t have time to experience any of Boxberg’s many festivals and cultural events. Everyone loves a German Christmas Market, but it wouldn’t be right to leave out mentioning the Village Festival (May), the mid-Summer Regatta (June), the Spring Festival (March), an Oktoberfest (September), or the Glühwein (Mulled Wine) Festival in January.

Chances are I’ve missed something — so I’m making it a point to come back.

 

preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload