Brechen — Festive Town Between Taunus And Westerwald

Oh yeah, what a trip the town of Brechen turned out to be. One year living in this place isn’t enough — so everyone pack their bags, you’re moving to Brechen for at least two.

What is really the best part (OK, one of the best parts) is how many festivals and cultural events are going on in a town of three villages that’s not even 25 square kilometers, and doesn’t even have 7,000 people living there.

There’s no way I can do this in one shot to explain them all. But, I’ll try…

The warmer weather kicks off the Spring Market in March, followed by the Easter bonfire, and a community Flea Market in April. Festivities in April end with the Tanz in den Mai (Dance into May) celebration on April 30th; with the Lantern Festival, the Hofmarkt, two Summer Festivals, and a Pfarrfest (a church festival) all in June.

No rest for the weary, so get your party face on for the Kirmes and another Flea Market in August; the Red Wine Festival, and a Kirmes and an Oktoberfest in September. October there’s yet another Oktoberfest and the Erntedankfest (Thanksgiving Festival of sorts); followed by an Autumn Market in November, and all the Advent and Christmas celebrations (like the Christmas themed Night Hikes) and markets you can handle.

Do you see why being here just one year isn’t enough? ;-)

And please, I haven’t even gotten to all of Brechen’s churches yet. In the village of Oberbrechen, for instance, you’ve got the Kirche der Heiligen Sieben Brüder, or Church of the Holy Seven Brothers.

Hey, if Türkheim can have the story of the Seven Swabians, Brechen can have Seven Holy Brothers, right? :-)

Back to the churches, Brechen’s got the Anthony and Lady Chapels, the Mariahilf Chapel, the 19th century St. Maximins Pfarrkirche (Parish Church); and in the smallest village of Werschau there’s the Parish Church of St. George.

However, the most famous of all the churches and chapels is the Bergerkirche. You’ll know it when you see it with its wide 13th century tower. The church is actually older than that, dating to the 10th century. And it was used as a local parish church for more than 570 years.

The only thing older in Brechen is the Alteburg, or Old Castle. Not a medieval one, BTW, it was Roman — and, don’t sweat, it’s not a castle to begin with. The entire military camp was said to have been gone by 9 A.D. Yeah, that’s a single digit. Brechen’s Alteburg is now an archaeological site in the Taunus.

Yeah, you know where I’m going next — hiking in the Taunus. And the Westerwald, which is not too far either. Don’t worry if you get lost — you’re living here in Brechen for the next couple of years; so no need to rush. ;-)

 

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