Hambergen — The Devil’s Marsh Gives It An Edge

It’s truly amazing the difference in landscape and culture from Southern Germany compared to Northern Germany.

Now I’d never have such a debate with myself, or anyone else for that matter, as to which one is “better” than the other. There’s no possible way to win such an argument. However, it’s places like Hambergen in Lower Saxony that could gain an edge to why the north could reign supreme.

First off, Hambergen lies within an area known as the Teufelsmoor (Devil’s Marsh). This natural landscape is just wonderful to bicycle along, which might explain why there are quite a few marked bike trails in these parts. These little lanes will take you past canals, farms, and bogs — not to mention they’re dotted with little rest areas with hearty places to eat.

Hambergen, and its four other villages, also appeal to your intellectual side. You’ll find an entire museum complex (known as the Museumsanlage Ströhe-Spreddig) full of thatched roof cottages — and where you’ll learn all about live in the moors. Come September the museum has its Handwerkertage or Artisans Days, which are great for finding all kinds of equipment and artwork from local craftsmen and artisans.

And the Umwelt- und Vorgeschichtsweg Seemoor has all kinds of information about archaeological sites of the Stone Age, the Bronze Age, and the Middle Age. Well, that’s a long name for a long history, isn’t it? ;-)

In the more recent history of Hambergen are some fine looking windmills. The one in the village of Lübberstedt is known for its gigantic Dutch Windmill, built in 1872. Vollersode also boasts its own windmill, and the town also has its own nature reserve.

It just keeps coming back to the nature side of things, huh? So, I guess this is a good time to mention the guided bog walks that are available. And then you’ve got all the camping kind of activities — you can even spend a few nights in “Farm Accommodations.”

You’re gonna need somewhere to sleep, considering you’ll be all tuckered out from horseback riding, swimming, hiking, or just sitting in on a seminar of Stone Age history. I can’t guarantee this last one won’t be in Low German, since this is spoken in the region.

Oh well, I guess it doesn’t matter what language anyone speaks on a quiet hike through the Wesermünder Geest or Stedener Forest, does it? Which are just two more arguments for a North vs. South battle.

 

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