Isernhagen Is A Typical Wealthy North German Town

On the northern outskirts of Hanover in Lower Saxony is the small town of Isernhagen. Surrounded by farmland and tiny woodlands, this extremely flat region is on the southern edge of the nature-filled Lüneburg Heath and a “green” get-a-way for hundreds of city-dwellers.

The town itself has a delightful history and many of the ancient half-timbered buildings are still in use by locals. The Isernhagenhof was once a farmyard barn but has now been converted to hold around 500 people for theater, concerts and business events.

There are also several specialized Hall Houses in the region, which are a local attraction. They are huge single storey timber-framed structures with a seemingly endless thatched roof!

The towns agricultural museum is housed in a perfect painted example of these regional buildings for you to admire — and this one is filled to the brim with history.

Isernhagen has plenty for the adventurer in you as well. The nearby Hufeisensee Wietzepark is a large recreational area specifically tailored for all ages — and all requirements! With slow, winding footpaths, fishing pools and woodland horse-back trekking to get you started. Then you can either lounge on the sandy beaches of the man-made lake or start playing beach volleyball with complete strangers!

Also, for recreation there are 2 large golf courses either side of Isernhagen for a quiet “work” day. Or there are the quieter lakes of the Parksee Lohne and Kirchhorster Lake, where you will be away from the crowds. Here you can walk through the landscaped gardens in peace.

If you want to be further away, then make yourself a nice picnic and head out along the Green Ring. This 160 km or 100 miles circuitous route follows the outskirts of Hanover, taking in all the most significant sites. The route is signposted clearly with blue markers and can be linked to public transport easily — if you happen to change your mind about walking the full distance! ;-)

Not far from town, you may find yourself exploring the mystical Altwanbüchen Marsh. Here is a place where past generations have dug peat for a living and as a result have left strange squares and patches of land sticking out of or submerged under the water. Add to this a whole woodland of half submerged birch trees and some mist — and let your imagination run wild!

 

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