Bad Brückenau — History And Spas In The Rhön Mountains

It was funny to hear that not all that much is known about the history of the Lower Franconian town of Bad Brückenau. I mean, how could anyone say that when it’s been a spa town for the last (at least) five centuries, and long before that Charlmagne knew about the place.

Oh yeah, and there used to be like four castles here at one point.

Make sense? Yeah, I thought so. ;-)

Look, I’m certainly not complaining about this Bavarian town. Nothing could be further from the truth. How could I? Hello, spa treatments!

King Ludwig I understood the importance of the spa experience. This is why he built the Große Kursaal, because it sure helps to look at something pretty while being pampered.

Along the Kurpark (Spa Park) is a beautifully decorated Baroque covered walkway, again commissioned by Ludwig. I can certainly see why he loved it here — and fitting townspeople named one of the many “source wells” after him.

One of the other mineral water sources is the Siebener Sprudel, coming out at a refreshing 18-degrees Celsius. The temp doesn’t make it curative — it’s the high mineral content.

Because Bad Brückenau has been a spa town for more than 500 years, people had to have some place to stay. In the Altstadt (Old Town) you’ll see the old buildings that used to be inns, and the pubs where they got to drink 16th century style. The bulk of all the hotels, however, didn’t come along until the 18th century.

The best way to see what life was like here back then, is pay a visit to the Heimatmuseum (Local History Museum). They’ll give you a good look at life here right up until the 19th century.

At this point of Bad Brückenau’s history, the town had a vibrant Jewish community — lasting right up until the 20th century. A memorial to the long-gone community at the Jewish cemetery exists today.

Also long gone is what used to be a 17th century Franciscan Monastery, known as Kloster Volkersberg.

The more I learn, the more I’m still confused on how anyone doesn’t know much about this place’s history.

Have I missed something? Oh yeah, the Church of St. Bartholomew (1783), and to mention the City Festival, the Park Festival (every July), and the Mantelsonntag — a Catholic festival that’s held on the Sunday before All Saints Day (November 1st).

I’m thinking that everyone just got all wrapped up in the whole spa experience to pay too much attention to Bad Brückenau’s history. Hey, it almost happened to me too. ;-)

 

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