Creußen — Feudality In Franconian Switzerland

Bureaucracy strikes again, thanks to the fact that the town of Creußen is also the “Seat” of the Verwaltungsgemeinschaft Creußen.

What does that mean to the average guy or gal reading this humble page? Simply put, it just means there’s more to see and do here in Upper Franconia. :-)

As for the politicians… I have no idea what they get out of it. ;-)

Who cares about them, I’m here for you — and my first duty is to tell you about the beautiful Franconian Switzerland countryside (not to mention the head of the Rote Main in the Lindenhardter Forst).

Here in the Fichtelgebirge, winter’s great for such activities like cross-country skiing. And no worries if the cold white stuff isn’t your idea of fun, a good old-fashioned hike could work wonders for the body and soul.

Plus, my outdoor loving friends, there are a dozen marked hiking and cycling routes — ranging from 2.8km to 16.5km. You’re only limited by your time and ability.

My history loving readers won’t be without things to do either. The Church of St. James has been around since the late 15th century, even though it did have to be rebuilt in the 1700s. Now don’t go confusing this religious structure with the Church of St. Michael — known for its absolutely stunning altar from the first years of the 16th century.

Even older than the churches is Creußen’s Stadtmauer, or city wall, built over the course of three years from 1358 to 1361 — giving Creußen that beloved medieval look & feel. The Altes Rathaus (Old Town Hall) is another historical building — built in 1470 to be exact.

Even if a building isn’t intact, doesn’t mean it isn’t without value, ya know. In the hamlet of Eimersmühle (whose population is zero!) the old dilapidated mill is still a very pretty architectural gem. And you’re close enough to go see the Burgstall Altenkünsberg, a castle originally from the 13th century.

As for castles, Schloss Bühl is nice to visit — that is if you’re into 15th/16th century building styles. Hell, who doesn’t like castles? I do, and I’m not afraid to say it. ;-)

Just be sure you leave enough time to visit the Krügemuseum, or Jug Museum. The kids don’t pay the entrance fee, so it’s affordable and informative for the whole family to visit.

More family fun is found at one of Creußen’s festivals or cultural events. You might want to leave the kids home if you’re visiting the Brauereikeller for beer tasting, but feel free to include the little ones in on the Kerwe (in early August), while the Brunnenfest (Fountain Festival) takes place at the end of June.

Shopper that I can be, I’m upset to have missed the International Pottery Market (Töpfermarkt) held on the second Sunday of July, while the Gregorifest is a 4-day event held every two years — it’s also quite historical having been celebrated here since the 1600s.

And while I have no idea what the modern day politicians get out of changing/adding/morphing the geography of Creußen, there’s no changing the fact that this place is nothing short of fabulous.

 

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