Schweich — Romans, Hospitality And Wine Along The Moselle

Depending on who you ask, Schweich in Rhineland-Palatinate is either on the Mosel or the Moselle. Wait, it’s the same river. It’s just that… being this close to Luxembourg it’s common to hear both French as well as German. (And its English name, BTW, is Moselle.)

Regardless what language you speak, I think you’ll find Schweich to be a charming and romantic lil’ town. Great… there’s the “R” word again. But, I got a better R-word for you. Romans.

Want another R-word? Römische Weinstrasse. Yup, Schweich lies on the Roman Wine Route following what was once a major supply route for the rowdy Romans.

The countryside is painted neatly with all sorts of vineyards on this small route — and Schweich has certainly earned its wine-drinking place. But, remember, no drinking & driving — so grab your most comfortable walking shoes and hike it.

You can’t spend your entire trip to Schweich all, uh, what’s the word? Oh yeah, half-lit. So, best to put the wine glass down for a spell — and hit up the 19th century St. Martin Church (it was built over an older one); see the Chapel of St. George, and former pilgrimage site of the Kapelle am Heilbrunnen.

Oh, I guess we’ve come up with another R-word: religious.

This isn’t the last of the religious sites either. Follow the Wegekapelle from around Schweich’s former Parish Church and you’ll see stunning pieces of religious art like its Crucifix and its Baroque statues.

Schweich’s 17th century former synagogue is now a cultural site with information on the town’s Jewish history (open Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays); and there’s also a well-preserved Jewish cemetery too.

Moving up a century, the Niederprümer Hof is where you can see what it was like to be a farmer back in the 18th century. Down in the wine cellar they’ve got wine tastings going on. A good place to discuss the farm’s exhibits on its famous-son poet, Stephan Andreas, wouldn’t ya say?

The 18th century also saw the construction of the Ferry Tower, once a bustling business along the Mosel, Moselle, or whatever you wanna call it. ;-)

Moving up another century to the 19th, Schweich got its own grinding mill. The Molitorsmühle, built 1824, is now a museum (open Saturdays and Sundays). A nice finish to the watermill, I’d say.

And a nice finish to Schweich, yes?

 

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